2019-01-28 19:50:29
Ten Church members have begun their service in the 116th United States Congress — including four members of the U.S. Senate and six from the U.S. House of Representatives. The Latter-day Saint lawmakers are all men and represent four different states: Arizona, Idaho, New Mexico and Utah. Eight are Republicans; the other two are Democrats. The 116th Congress has the fewest number of members in at least a decade. Ten members claiming Church affiliation is the lowest over the last six congresses, according to the Pew Research Center. Latter-day Saints in the U.S. Senate Michael D. Crapo, R-Idaho, has served in the Senate since 1999. He also served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1993 to 1999. Mike Lee, R-Utah, has served in the Senate since 2011. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, begins his first term in the Senate. He previously served as governor of Massachusetts (2003-2007) and was the Republican nominee in the 2012 presidential election. Tom Udall, D-New Mexico, has served in the Senate since 2009. He also represented New Mexico in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1999 to 2009. Latter-day Saints in the U.S. House of Representatives Andy Biggs, R-Arizona, begins his second term in U.S. Congress. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, has served in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2003. John Curtis, R-Utah, began serving in the U.S. House of Representatives in November of 2017 after the resignation of fellow Latter-day Saint legislator Jason Chaffetz. Ben McAdams, D-Utah, begins his maiden term in the U.S. House of Representatives. He defeated incumbent and fellow Church member Mia Love in the 2018 election. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, has served in the U.S. House of Representatives since 1999. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, has served in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2013. El anterior artículo es una traducción automática y en tiempo real del original en inglés que puedes consultar en el artículo «https://www.thechurchnews.com/members/2019-01-28/these-10-latter-day-saints-hold-positions-in-us-congress-and-thats-the-lowest-number-in-nearly-a-decade-48868».

Ten Church members have begun their service in the 116th United States Congress — including four members of the U.S. Senate and six from the U.S. House of Representatives.

The Latter-day Saint lawmakers are all men and represent four different states: Arizona, Idaho, New Mexico and Utah. Eight are Republicans; the other two are Democrats.

The 116th Congress has the fewest number of members in at least a decade. Ten members claiming Church affiliation is the lowest over the last six congresses, according to the Pew Research Center.

Latter-day Saints in the U.S. Senate

  • Michael D. Crapo, R-Idaho, has served in the Senate since 1999. He also served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1993 to 1999.
  • Mike Lee, R-Utah, has served in the Senate since 2011.
  • Mitt Romney, R-Utah, begins his first term in the Senate. He previously served as governor of Massachusetts (2003-2007) and was the Republican nominee in the 2012 presidential election.
  • Tom Udall, D-New Mexico, has served in the Senate since 2009. He also represented New Mexico in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1999 to 2009.

Latter-day Saints in the U.S. House of Representatives

  • Andy Biggs, R-Arizona, begins his second term in U.S. Congress.
  • Rob Bishop, R-Utah, has served in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2003.
  • John Curtis, R-Utah, began serving in the U.S. House of Representatives in November of 2017 after the resignation of fellow Latter-day Saint legislator Jason Chaffetz.
  • Ben McAdams, D-Utah, begins his maiden term in the U.S. House of Representatives. He defeated incumbent and fellow Church member Mia Love in the 2018 election.
  • Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, has served in the U.S. House of Representatives since 1999.
  • Chris Stewart, R-Utah, has served in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2013.
El anterior artículo es una traducción automática y en tiempo real del original en inglés que puedes consultar en el artículo «https://www.thechurchnews.com/members/2019-01-28/these-10-latter-day-saints-hold-positions-in-us-congress-and-thats-the-lowest-number-in-nearly-a-decade-48868«.